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Echa un vistazo a la nueva en infografica sobre la cuota de 34,000 inmigrantes en detención: #NoMásCuota

DWN Blog - June 16, 2014 - 09:12
Haga clic en la imagen para ver la versión más grande (o descargar en PDF aquí):


Estados Unidos tiene la infraestructura para la detención de inmigrantes más grande del mundo y hoy, el gobierno de los EE.UU. encierra y deporta a más inmigrantes que nunca antes. La expansión del sistema se debe en parte a una arbitraria cuota establecida por el Congreso requiriendo el encarcelamiento de 34,000 inmigrantes en cualquier momento dado. La cuota de camas para inmigrantes en detención, que empezó en el 2009, requiere que el Servicio de Inmigración y Control de Aduanas (ICE, por sus siglas en inglés) encierre a un promedio de 34,000 inmigrantes -cerca de medio millón al año-en una red de más de 250 cárceles de condado y estatales, prisiones privadas e instalaciones federales.

Aquí están las versiones recortadas de la imagen para compartir en las redes sociales (haga clic para descargar los tamaños más grandes de la imagen)

   


via @LatinoAdvocacy1: #FathersDay Fast & Rally at Northwest Detention Center in #Tacoma

DWN Blog - June 13, 2014 - 21:41

Photo from April 2014 Action in Tacoma

MEDIA ADVISORY For immediate release: June 12, 2014

 Contact: Maru Mora Villalpando (206) 251-6658  and Jolinda Stephens (614) 915-4079

WHAT: Rally and Report from the Morning’s People’s Movement Assembly

WHEN: Saturday, June 14, 1 pm

WHERE: Northwest Detention Center, Tacoma, WA

WHO:  Hunger strike leaders, families of those detained in the immigration prison and migration justice groups from around the Pacific Northwest

HIGHLIGHTS: Details of the actions plans developed by local groups in collaboration with detention and migration justice groups in the U. S., Canada, Spain and England; Fathers Day Fast announced.

 About 100 families separated by the deportation machine and groups working to bring justice to the immigration system will meet in Tacoma Saturday morning, June 14. They will be joined via Skype with groups from the U. S. and around the world, including the Detention Watch Network (DC), Conroe TX detention center supporters, No One Is Illegal of Toronto, No CIEs of Valencia and Madrid (Spain), Bill of Rights Defense Committee and the National Day Laborers Organizing Network. They will share the work they are doing and develop shared strategies to address the crisis facing families torn apart by immigration practices. The rally will include reports from that assembly, as well a music loud enough to be heard inside the immigration prison and phone calls from inside which may announce a new hunger strike.

On the eve of the celebration of family, Fathers’ Day, the rally will support all those separated from their families. “We are doing all of this to make the President understand and to finally do something,” remarked Veronica Noriega, wife of hunger strike leader Ramon Mendoza Pascual. “We would like the President to explain to all of our children why they can’t hug their parents this Fathers’ Day. How would he tell them that he is deporting their parents. Everyone talks about the economy. They talk about the border, but they don’t talk about the children who won’t be able to hug their parents this Fathers’ Day. Enough! Not one more!”

Despite concerted efforts by Geo and ICE to impede organizing, Colectiva de Detenidos NWDC is organizing a Fathers’ Day Fast. We expect to hear from some of those leaders at the rally.

The Peoples Movement Assembly in planning for several weeks is meeting at a politically crucial time. “With the defeat of Cong. Cantor, the President has lost his excuse to delay desperately needed relief for undocumented immigrants. There now remains not one ray of hope that Congress will pass the Senate bill or any version of it for several years,” said Maru Mora Villalpando, one of the assembly organizers. “We cannot wait any longer. The country cannot wait any longer. The great majority of the American people are generous and welcoming to immigrants. It is time for President Obama to act. No more excuses.”

###

Petition on behalf of Hunger Strikers and latest releases available at: www.notonemoredeportation.com/2014/03/10/detention-hunger-strike/

Fund to support the families of human rights hunger strikers: http://www.gofundme.com/7orehg


via @SEARAC: June 21st vigils for Cambodian families in #Seattle, #Stockton & #DC

DWN Blog - June 13, 2014 - 20:25
via Mari Quenemoen, Policy Manager, Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC) Please join us and our community partners in Stockton, Seattle, and Washington, DC on Saturday, June 21st for simultaneous vigils in support of families of Cambodian former refugees who are facing imminent deportation.  Touch Hak and dozens of others, including two men from the Stockton area, were detained at the Tacoma Northwest Detention Center last month and processed for deportation to Cambodia. Please come to show your support for them, their wives, children, parents, and communities who are experiencing deep shock and trauma from these detentions and deportations, and show ICE that AAPI immigrant communities and their allies are standing up in Stockton, Seattle, DC, and across the country against deportation. Stay tuned for event listings.

Watch: Recorded Webinar on How You Can Help #EndtheQuota for Immigration Detention

DWN Blog - June 12, 2014 - 17:30

The expansion of the immigrant detention system is in part due to an arbitrary quota from Congress that requires the incarceration of 34,000 immigrants in detention at any given time. The immigration detention bed quota, which started in 2009, requires Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to lock-up an average of 34,000 immigrants in detention – close to half a million immigrants annually – in a network of over 250 county and state jails, private prisons and federal facilities. In this webinar we explain the very basics of what the detention bed quota is, and the process on how we can eliminate it. We also share information about the End The Quota campaign and ways in which organizations and individuals can get involved.


Watch: #EndTheQuota in House Appropriations Committee Meeting June 11, 2014

DWN Blog - June 11, 2014 - 15:53

In the House Appropriations hearing on the Department of Homeland Security funding, there were a lot of great statements on the bed quota throughout the hearing. Rep. Lowey condemns the bed quota in her opening remarks. Rep. Quigley introduced an amendment to eliminate the quota, and Reps. Honda, Serrano, and Valadao all spoke in favor the amendment. Quigley withdrew the amendment since he knew it wouldn’t pass the committee; however, no one spoke out in opposition to the amendment.


New Infographic to #EndTheQuota for Immigration Detention

DWN Blog - June 11, 2014 - 11:46
Click image to view larger version (or download PDF here):

The United States has the largest immigrant detention infrastructure in the world and today, the U.S. government locks up and deports more immigrants than ever before. The expansion of the system is in part due to an arbitrary quota from Congress that requires the incarceration of 34,000 immigrants in detention at any given time. The immigration detention bed quota, which started in 2009, requires Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to lock-up an average of 34,000 immigrants in detention – close to half a million immigrants annually – in a network of over 250 county and state jails, private prisons and federal facilities.

Here are cropped versions for sharing on social media (click for larger sizes):


 


New @ACLU report: Warehoused & Forgotten – Immigrants Trapped in Our Shadow #PrivatePrisons System

DWN Blog - June 10, 2014 - 09:13

via Carl Takei, Staff Attorney, National Prison Project, American Civil Liberties Union

I am very pleased to announce a new report by the ACLU and ACLU of Texas, “Warehoused and Forgotten: Immigrants Trapped in Our Shadow Private-Prison System” (June 2014).  Every year, the federal Bureau of Prisons subjects tens of thousands of immigrants to lengthy prison sentences simply for unlawfully crossing the border. These nonviolent immigrants are hidden in a shadow system of privately run Criminal Alien Requirement (CAR) prisons. Our a multi-year investigation of the five CAR prisons in Texas uncovered evidence of abysmal conditions, families torn apart, and the excessive use of isolated confinement. For too long, CAR facilities have operated in the shadows, effectively free from public scrutiny.  That ends now.

See the report and other materials summarizing our findings online at: aclu.org/CARabuse

Please read and share links widely.  Also, if you have Twitter, we are using the hashtag #CARabuse to promote the report.  Some suggested tweets:
*        New ACLU, ACLU TX report on BOP’s warehousing of immigrants in a shadow for-profit prison system http://bit.ly/1pFtl11 #CARabuse
*        New ACLU, ACLU TX report: “the symbol of everything wrong w/ criminalizing #immigration and #massincarceration http://bit.ly/1pFtl11 #CARabuse

Please feel free to get in touch with me if you have any questions about the report!


34 Days to End the 34,000 Quota! / 34 días para eliminar la cuota!

DWN Blog - June 9, 2014 - 14:13

Click for larger image to download

The next 34 days are critical in our collective efforts to end the 34,000 immigrant detention quota. Sign-up today to get involved during the 34 Days to End The Quota.

During the month of June, the House of Representatives will be voting on the Fiscal Year 2015 appropriations bill, which includes the detention bed quota. In the meantime, 34,000 immigrants continue to be locked-up at any given time in detention and thousands of families and communities continue to be torn apart. Now is the time to ADVOCATE, EDUCATE and ORGANIZE to #EndTheQuota. From watching and sharing the End The Quota video, and signing-up to host an event or action in your community, to calling and meeting with your members of Congress, we need all hands on deck! Now is the time to act and stop the arbitrary quota that keeps thousands of immigrants behind jail walls.

Here are 6 things you can do to End The Quota: 
  1. Join DWN’s End The Quota webinar, this Thursday, June 12th at 2:00 p.m. EDT. Register here.
  2. Hold educational events, community forums or teach-ins about the immigration detention system and the impact of the 34,000 detention bed quota on our communities. For educational materials and resources go here.
  3. Call and/or visit your members of Congress and ask them to eliminate the immigration detention bed quota from the FY 2015 appropriations bill.  Ask your Representative to vote for the Deutch-Foster amendment that strikes the quota language from the bill. For advocacy materials go here.
  4. Organize an action, or vigil outside a detention center, ICE office or congressional member’s office. Contact Catalina Nieto cnieto@detentionwatchnetwork.org for support.
  5. Write an op-ed or letter to the editor about the impact of the quota in your community. For sample talking points go here.
  6. Share End The Quota action alerts, videos, infographics, posters, and fact sheets viaFacebookTwitter, Instagram, e-mail, and blogs.
For more info or to get involved contact Catalina Nieto at cnieto@detentionwatchnetwork.org ————————– Los próximos 34 días son cruciales para nuestros esfuerzos colectivos por eliminar la cuota de 34,000 camas para inmigrantes en detención. Inscríbete hoy mismo y participa en la campaña 34 Días para Eliminar la Cuota.

Durante el mes de junio, la Cámara de Representantes del Congreso estará votando la ley de asignaciones presupuestarias para el año 2015 la cual incluye una cuota para camas en detención. Mientras tanto, se sigue encerrando a 34,000 inmigrantes en cualquier momento dado y miles de familias y comunidades continúan siendo destrozadas. Ahora es el momento para ABOGAR, EDUCAR y ORGANIZARSE para #EndtheQuota, #NoMásCuota.

Desde ver y compartir el video para Eliminar la Cuotaapuntarte para organizar un evento o acción en tu comunidad o llamar y reunirte con tus representantes en el Congreso-¡necesitamos la ayuda de todos!  Es el momento de actuar y acabar con esa arbitraria cuota que mantiene a miles de inmigrantes tras las rejas de una cárcel.

A continuación te sugerimos 6 cosas que Tú puedes hacer para Eliminar la Cuota:
  1. Unirte al webinar de DWN sobre Eliminar la Cuota, este jueves, 12 de junio a las 2:00p.m. hora este. Inscríbete aquí.
  2. Organizar eventos educativos, foros comunitarios o talleres acerca del sistema de detención de inmigrantes y el impacto que tiene la cuota de 34,000 camas sobre nuestras comunidades.Para ver y descargar material educativo y recursos de referencia haz clic aquí.
  3. Llamar o visitar a los miembros del Congreso y pedirles que eliminen la cuota de camas para inmigrantes en detención de la ley de asignaciones del año fiscal 2015. Pídele a tu representante que vote por la enmienda DeutchFoster que anulara el lenguaje sobre la cuota de detención de la ley de asignaciones. Para ver materiales de defensoría legislativa haz clic aquí.
  4. Organizar una acción o vigilia afuera de un centro de detención, de las oficinas del Servicio de Inmigración o de la oficina de un congresista. comunícate con Catalina Nieto a:cnieto@detentionwatchnetwork.org si necesitas apoyo.
  5. Escribir una nota de opinión o una carta al editor acerca del impacto de la cuota en tu comunidad. Para ver ejemplos de los puntos a tratar dirígete aquí.
  6. Comparte boletines, videos, afiches, infográficas y material de referencia acerca de la campaña para Eliminar la Cuota a través de FacebookTwitter, Instagram, por correo electrónico o en blogs.
Para mayor información comunícate con Catalina Nieto a: cnieto@detentionwatchnetwork.org

Watch via @HRW: “Don’t Call 911″ – Immigrant crime victims in Nashville, TN discuss #SComm

DWN Blog - June 4, 2014 - 11:36

via Human Rights Watch:

The use of state and local authorities to enforce US immigration laws undermines public safety by raising fear of the police among immigrant communities. States and cities across the United States should separate community police work from federal immigration enforcement.

The 3:44-minute video, which contains accounts from immigrant crime victims in Nashville, Tennessee, illustrates that the federal Secure Communities program, which enlists local law enforcement throughout the country in federal efforts to identify immigrants eligible for deportation, makes immigrants afraid to report crimes to the police. Human Rights Watch reported in 2012 on similar fears of law enforcement among female farmworkers who are survivors of sexual assault.

Watch more here.


via @ACLU: Immigrants Held Indefinitely Without a Hearing? Another Court Says No

DWN Blog - May 28, 2014 - 14:40

Written by Michael Tan, Staff Attorney, Immigrants’ Rights Project, ACLU

The more judges who scrutinize the United States’ broken immigration enforcement system, the more and more they’re yelling, “Stop.”

A federal district court in Massachusetts yesterday ordered the government to end its practice of putting immigrants in long-term lock up without ever providing them the basic due process of a bond hearing. As a result, immigrants in Massachusetts subjected to six months of mandatory imprisonment can now seek a hearing before an immigration judge to determine whether they should stay in jail or be allowed to go home to their families and communities.

The ruling in Reid v. Donelan puts the brakes on one of the most draconian and unforgiving aspects of our immigration enforcement system.

Mandatory detention laws enacted by Congress in 1996 require the authorities to hold a person in jail if the government decides to pursue a deportation case based on his past crimes. That’s the case even if the person’s crimes were minor and nonviolent – like shoplifting or marijuana possession – and took place more than a decade ago. And it doesn’t even matter if the person has since rehabilitated himself and become a model member of society. To make matters worse, the government insists that the immigrant’s detention is required for as long as it takes for his case to be decided – even if that process takes months or years. This requirement even applies if it’s clear that the immigrant’s going to win his case and be legally permitted to stay in the country.

Take the case of Alejandro Rodriguez, a Mexican national who has been in the United States since he was a baby. He was detained for more than three years without a meaningful hearing over his imprisonment. Prior to his detention, Rodriguez lived near his extended family in Los Angeles, working as a dental assistant to support his two U.S. citizen children. His claim against removal hinged on whether he could be deported for two non-violent convictions—joyriding when he was 19, and a misdemeanor drug possession when he was 24. Rodriguez was denied release by ICE on the basis of administrative file custody reviews in which ICE rejected his requests for release based entirely on a written questionnaire, without even interviewing him. After Rodriguez filed a habeas petition in district court—but before the petition was adjudicated—ICE released him on his own recognizance, revealing that the agency had never considered him a flight risk or danger to the community. He remained released on conditions of supervision without incident until he won his immigration case. He currently lives in Los Angeles.

Fortunately, the courts are listening to Rodriguez and others like him. Yesterday’s ruling joins a chorus of federal courts holding that such long-term detention without a bond hearing is unlawful and builds upon the ACLU’s landmark victory in Rodriguez v. Robbins, a class action lawsuit that won bond hearings after six months for detainees throughout the Ninth Circuit last spring.

These courts recognize a basic principle: In America, no one should be held in long-term jail without a hearing to determine if he or she needs to be locked up in the first place. As the Obama administration completes its review of its immigration enforcement policies, it should adopt the rulings of Reid and Rodriguez nationwide and provide bond hearings to all immigrant detainees after no more than six months of detention.

Only a nationwide rule will ensure due process truly applies to all across America.


via @ACLU: Coast to Coast, Federal Courts Say NO to Mandatory Lock-up of Immigrants

DWN Blog - May 22, 2014 - 15:12

Written by Eunice Lee, Detention Attorney, ACLU, Immigrants’ Rights Project and reposted from ACLU blog:

The tide is turning against U.S. Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE)’s policy of picking up our community members and locking them away without a hearing.

Coast to coast, federal courts are saying “no” to this unjust and irrational practice.

Yesterday, a federal judge in an ACLU case ordered ICE to “immediately cease and desist” its unlawful practice of denying a bond hearing to people detained throughout Massachusetts based on crimes that are typically minor – like shoplifting or drug possession – and that occurred years ago. Judge Ponsor ruled that immigrants who are picked up by ICE after returning to their lives, their families, their jobs, and their communities must be given a chance to ask an immigration judge for their release. He explained, “An individual’s right to the due process is not eradicated simply because he or she has been convicted of a crime at some point in his or her life.”

Our Massachusetts victory comes on the heels of another ACLU class action win on the other side of the country. Last week in Preap v. Holder, Judge Gonzales Rogers required ICE to give bond hearings to people picked up by ICE in their communities throughout the state of California.

And before that in another ACLU case, Khoury v. Asher, a judge reached the same conclusion for community members in western Washington state. There, too, ICE must now stop picking up people in their workplaces and homes and putting them in no-bond detention.

Under our immigration laws, lock-up without a bond hearing applies only to a narrow group of people who are taken in by ICE immediately after serving sentences for certain crimes. ICE, however, unlawfully applies this draconian form of detention to people picked up months or years after the fact. It thus locked away Richard Clayton Gordon—the lead plaintiff in our Massachusetts case and a U.S. army veteran—for a single stale drug conviction.

That conviction is now six years old.

At the time ICE encountered Mr. Gordon, he had returned to his family, gotten engaged, had a child, bought a house, and started plans to build a halfway house for his community. He also had no subsequent run-ins with the law whatsoever. And yet, ICE still put him in jail and denied him a bond hearing.

Fortunately, thanks to ACLU’s victories, immigrants picked up by ICE in their communities must now be given the basic due process of a bond hearing. There, they can ask an immigration judge to decide whether they ever needed to be locked up in the first place. If the answer is no, the immigration judge must – and in Mr. Gordon’s case did – order their release from unnecessary and unfair ICE detention.

It’s a shame that it took a federal lawsuit to secure Mr. Gordon’s release. People like him simply shouldn’t be locked away without first seeing a judge – a cornerstone of our democracy. Now in Washington, California, and Massachusetts, they can’t be. It’s time for the Obama administration to listen to the courts as well as to its conscience and end its unlawful practice nationwide.


Watch: ¡No Estoy Sola! #EndtheQuota Action in Washington, DC

DWN Blog - May 20, 2014 - 19:51

Post written by Tory Johnson reposted from the FCNL blog:

“You are not alone! ¡Tú no estás solo!” These calls of support nearly brought me to tears as I stood in front of the White House last Friday, risking arrest for the first time. Four others stood with me, looking into a crowd of over 100 people standing with us, calling for an end to the immigration detention quota.

In 2009, Congress mandated that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) maintain a minimum of 33,400 detention beds. The 2010 DHS appropriations bill increased this quota to 34,000, where it remains today. The language requires immigration officials to maintain this level of detention beds, and historically both DHS officials and members of Congress have interpreted this as a requirement to fill all of the beds.

Think about that for moment.

34,000 people held in detention on a daily basis because of a line in an appropriations bill. Operating immigration detention on a quota system is a further injustice in a detention and deportation dragnet that flawed at its core. Reports of  due process rights, and retaliatory treatment in detention centers continue to surface. Last year more than 400,000 people were pushed through U.S. detention and deportation proceedings, the highest number on record.

And why? I’ve listened to the stories of immigrants who risked everything to come to the U.S. for a better life, forced to leave their homes because U.S. trade policies changed the economic reality in Mexico and Central America for millions of people. I am incredibly grateful to be a U.S. citizen, but I didn’t have to work for it. I was born here, which afforded me an immense amount of access and privilege. Why are we punishing people for wanting the same?

I was arrested for civil disobedience because I am outraged that my friends, members of our families and our communities are being treated as a number. As a problem to be dealt with. Immigrants are PEOPLE. Yet they’re being used to fill a quota, generating profits for private prison companies, and the majority of taxpaying Americans have no idea. In 2013, the detention budget for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) cost taxpayers $2.8 billion. In the same year, Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) and Geo Group, two of the three corporations operating private detention facilities, each raked in more than $200 million in revenue from contracts with ICE to operate detention centers.

It is despicable that we’re using a quota to lock people up at an alarming rate while our immigration system remains in shambles. Rather than providing realistic and meaningful ways for people to come to the country legally, U.S. policy is disproportionately focused on finding and locking up immigrants. In this system, the only winners are private corporations. The bed quota is one aspect of this bloated system, and we can eliminate it this year.

I’m not saying you have to go out and get arrested, but we must call attention to this fiscally and morally irresponsible policy and demand an end to the quota.


Watch: ¡No Estoy Sola! #EndtheQuota Action in Washington, DC

DWN Blog - May 20, 2014 - 19:51

Post written by Tory Johnson reposted from the FCNL blog:

“You are not alone! ¡Tú no estás solo!” These calls of support nearly brought me to tears as I stood in front of the White House last Friday, risking arrest for the first time. Four others stood with me, looking into a crowd of over 100 people standing with us, calling for an end to the immigration detention quota.

In 2009, Congress mandated that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) maintain a minimum of 33,400 detention beds. The 2010 DHS appropriations bill increased this quota to 34,000, where it remains today. The language requires immigration officials to maintain this level of detention beds, and historically both DHS officials and members of Congress have interpreted this as a requirement to fill all of the beds.

Think about that for moment.

34,000 people held in detention on a daily basis because of a line in an appropriations bill. Operating immigration detention on a quota system is a further injustice in a detention and deportation dragnet that flawed at its core. Reports of  due process rights, and retaliatory treatment in detention centers continue to surface. Last year more than 400,000 people were pushed through U.S. detention and deportation proceedings, the highest number on record.

And why? I’ve listened to the stories of immigrants who risked everything to come to the U.S. for a better life, forced to leave their homes because U.S. trade policies changed the economic reality in Mexico and Central America for millions of people. I am incredibly grateful to be a U.S. citizen, but I didn’t have to work for it. I was born here, which afforded me an immense amount of access and privilege. Why are we punishing people for wanting the same?

I was arrested for civil disobedience because I am outraged that my friends, members of our families and our communities are being treated as a number. As a problem to be dealt with. Immigrants are PEOPLE. Yet they’re being used to fill a quota, generating profits for private prison companies, and the majority of taxpaying Americans have no idea. In 2013, the detention budget for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) cost taxpayers $2.8 billion. In the same year, Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) and Geo Group, two of the three corporations operating private detention facilities, each raked in more than $200 million in revenue from contracts with ICE to operate detention centers.

It is despicable that we’re using a quota to lock people up at an alarming rate while our immigration system remains in shambles. Rather than providing realistic and meaningful ways for people to come to the country legally, U.S. policy is disproportionately focused on finding and locking up immigrants. In this system, the only winners are private corporations. The bed quota is one aspect of this bloated system, and we can eliminate it this year.

I’m not saying you have to go out and get arrested, but we must call attention to this fiscally and morally irresponsible policy and demand an end to the quota.


via @NDLON: 150+ Groups Call on DHS Sec. Johnson to End ICE Holds

DWN Blog - May 19, 2014 - 12:52

Reposted from the National Day Laborer Organizing Network

Image by Martha Ocampo via notonemoredeportation.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Salvador Sarmiento, sgsarmiento@ndlon.org, (202) 746-2099

As the President moves to “reboot” Secure Communities, advocates demand complete end to key component of the program

May 16, 2014, Washington, DC—A day after President Obama and DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson announced they would take a “fresh look” at the Secure Communities deportation program—widely criticized for contributing to rampant racial profiling and an unprecedented level of deportations—over 150 organizations delivered a letter to the Secretary demanding an end to ICE holds, a key component of the program. 

Over 150 immigrant, labor, faith, and civil rights organizations, including the National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON), endorsed the letter, which asks Secretary Johnson to use his “existing legal authority to end ICE’s use of holds to enlist local police as so-called ‘force-multipliers’ that amplify the enforcement of unjust immigration laws.”  ICE holds are requests from ICE to local law enforcement agencies to detain individuals suspected of civil immigration violations; as part of the Secure Communities program (S-Comm), they have led to the deportation of hundreds of thousands of individuals since President Obama took office.

The letter comes just weeks after the Acting Inspector General of DHS was suspended for corruption, including altering a report that was supposed to address criticism of S-Comm. Congresswoman Roybal-Allard has called for a new investigation, noting that DHS has consistently failed to ensure appropriate “accountability of the flawed Secure Communities program.”

To date, over 60 jurisdictions across the country have passed policies limiting or ending submission to ICE holds. The national trend comes as a response to S-Comm’s indiscriminate separation of families and chilling effect on immigrant communities’ willingness to reach out to police for assistance. Most recently, dozens of counties across three states—Oregon, Washington, and Colorado—have announced that they will no longer respond to ICE holds following a federal district court decision that held that detaining an individual on the basis of an ICE hold violates the Fourth Amendment.

On April 17, 19 activists were arrested in a civil disobedience at the Suffolk Detention Center in Boston, MA calling for an end to S-Comm and condemning the President’s record 2 million deportations since taking office.

“Among the irreparable problems with S-Comm is the fact that it has been unsuccessfully rebooted so many times that it is now impossible for a ‘fresh start’, which is why the consensus view is that it should be scrapped entirely,” said Salvador G. Sarmiento of NDLON. “And we cannot start to talk about humane policies while these programs continue to instill fear in immigrant communities and permit widespread abuse.”

Read the full letter here


via @NDLON: 150+ Groups Call on DHS Sec. Johnson to End ICE Holds

DWN Blog - May 19, 2014 - 12:52

Reposted from the National Day Laborer Organizing Network

Image by Martha Ocampo via notonemoredeportation.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Salvador Sarmiento, sgsarmiento@ndlon.org, (202) 746-2099

As the President moves to “reboot” Secure Communities, advocates demand complete end to key component of the program

May 16, 2014, Washington, DC—A day after President Obama and DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson announced they would take a “fresh look” at the Secure Communities deportation program—widely criticized for contributing to rampant racial profiling and an unprecedented level of deportations—over 150 organizations delivered a letter to the Secretary demanding an end to ICE holds, a key component of the program. 

Over 150 immigrant, labor, faith, and civil rights organizations, including the National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON), endorsed the letter, which asks Secretary Johnson to use his “existing legal authority to end ICE’s use of holds to enlist local police as so-called ‘force-multipliers’ that amplify the enforcement of unjust immigration laws.”  ICE holds are requests from ICE to local law enforcement agencies to detain individuals suspected of civil immigration violations; as part of the Secure Communities program (S-Comm), they have led to the deportation of hundreds of thousands of individuals since President Obama took office.

The letter comes just weeks after the Acting Inspector General of DHS was suspended for corruption, including altering a report that was supposed to address criticism of S-Comm. Congresswoman Roybal-Allard has called for a new investigation, noting that DHS has consistently failed to ensure appropriate “accountability of the flawed Secure Communities program.”

To date, over 60 jurisdictions across the country have passed policies limiting or ending submission to ICE holds. The national trend comes as a response to S-Comm’s indiscriminate separation of families and chilling effect on immigrant communities’ willingness to reach out to police for assistance. Most recently, dozens of counties across three states—Oregon, Washington, and Colorado—have announced that they will no longer respond to ICE holds following a federal district court decision that held that detaining an individual on the basis of an ICE hold violates the Fourth Amendment.

On April 17, 19 activists were arrested in a civil disobedience at the Suffolk Detention Center in Boston, MA calling for an end to S-Comm and condemning the President’s record 2 million deportations since taking office.

“Among the irreparable problems with S-Comm is the fact that it has been unsuccessfully rebooted so many times that it is now impossible for a ‘fresh start’, which is why the consensus view is that it should be scrapped entirely,” said Salvador G. Sarmiento of NDLON. “And we cannot start to talk about humane policies while these programs continue to instill fear in immigrant communities and permit widespread abuse.”

Read the full letter here


via @ACLU: Judge Rules to Limit Mandatory Detention of Immigrants in California

DWN Blog - May 17, 2014 - 11:43
For Immediate Release via ACLU :  May 16, 2014 Media Contact: (415) 621-2493 (press@aclunc.org) Immigration judge grants motion for preliminary injunction requiring the government to give certain immigrants a bond hearing in California.

On Thursday May 15, United States District Court Judge for the Northern District of California, Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers granted a motion for a preliminary injunction and motion for class certification in Preap v. Holder, a class action lawsuit in which Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Asian Law Caucus and the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California, with lead counsel Keker Van Nest, LLP, challenged the federal government’s practice in California of detaining certain immigrants without bond, often for many months, while they face deportation proceedings.

By refusing these detainees bond hearings at which they can demonstrate their fitness for release because they are neither a flight risk nor a public safety risk, the government was effectively tearing immigrants away from their families, their communities, and their livelihoods and compromising their access to representation.  Many immigrants caught in the mandatory detention dragnet are longtime residents of the United States who have rehabilitated themselves, raised families and they will now have the opportunity to make an individualized case against their detention.

“This case has the power to stop the federal government’s outrageous process of holding people without bond. We are now one step closer to ensuring those who aspire to be citizens are treated fairly before the law,” said lead counsel and Keker & Van Nest Partner Jon Streeter.

“Fair process is at the core of our country’s system of justice. The Court rightly acknowledged that not even the government is above the law, and cannot deny bond hearings to individuals who are plainly entitled to them,” said Keker & Van Nest attorney Stacy Chen.

“The decision places some necessary limits on the federal government’s expansive use of mandatory detention, a practice that has been devastating immigrant families for nearly two decades,” said Alison Pennington of Advancing Justice-Asian Law Caucus.

“This is an important victory that pushes back against our inhumane and abusive immigration detention system,” said Julia Harumi Mass, Senior Staff Attorney with the ACLU of Northern California. “In addition to monitoring the compliance with this injunction, the ACLU will continue to seek reforms that respect our fundamental sense of fairness for immigration detainees.”

 


via @ACLU: Judge Rules to Limit Mandatory Detention of Immigrants in California

DWN Blog - May 17, 2014 - 11:43
For Immediate Release via ACLU :  May 16, 2014 Media Contact: (415) 621-2493 (press@aclunc.org) Immigration judge grants motion for preliminary injunction requiring the government to give certain immigrants a bond hearing in California.

On Thursday May 15, United States District Court Judge for the Northern District of California, Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers granted a motion for a preliminary injunction and motion for class certification in Preap v. Holder, a class action lawsuit in which Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Asian Law Caucus and the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California, with lead counsel Keker Van Nest, LLP, challenged the federal government’s practice in California of detaining certain immigrants without bond, often for many months, while they face deportation proceedings.

By refusing these detainees bond hearings at which they can demonstrate their fitness for release because they are neither a flight risk nor a public safety risk, the government was effectively tearing immigrants away from their families, their communities, and their livelihoods and compromising their access to representation.  Many immigrants caught in the mandatory detention dragnet are longtime residents of the United States who have rehabilitated themselves, raised families and they will now have the opportunity to make an individualized case against their detention.

“This case has the power to stop the federal government’s outrageous process of holding people without bond. We are now one step closer to ensuring those who aspire to be citizens are treated fairly before the law,” said lead counsel and Keker & Van Nest Partner Jon Streeter.

“Fair process is at the core of our country’s system of justice. The Court rightly acknowledged that not even the government is above the law, and cannot deny bond hearings to individuals who are plainly entitled to them,” said Keker & Van Nest attorney Stacy Chen.

“The decision places some necessary limits on the federal government’s expansive use of mandatory detention, a practice that has been devastating immigrant families for nearly two decades,” said Alison Pennington of Advancing Justice-Asian Law Caucus.

“This is an important victory that pushes back against our inhumane and abusive immigration detention system,” said Julia Harumi Mass, Senior Staff Attorney with the ACLU of Northern California. “In addition to monitoring the compliance with this injunction, the ACLU will continue to seek reforms that respect our fundamental sense of fairness for immigration detainees.”

 


via @ILRC_SF: Legal Developments on ICE Holds – explanation & resources

DWN Blog - May 15, 2014 - 09:07

via Lena Graber, Special Projects Attorney, Immigrant Legal Resource Center

As many or all of you know, there have been some exciting developments on ICE holds/detainers in the last few weeks.  First a court of appeals found that they were not mandatory, and then an Oregon court found that holding someone on a detainer was unconstitutional and that the county owed her money damages.

As a result, dozens of sheriffs are changing their policies and refusing to act on any ICE holds.  See our map of detainer policies at ilrc.org/enforcement  (although it is getting hard to keep up with all the changes!)

Attached is a PDF short advisory from ILRC on the recent court decisions and what they mean, as well as advice on how to use this information with your own local sheriffs or other law enforcement and elected officials.  Also attached are PDF letters that were sent from NWIRP, ACLU, and several California organizations to sheriffs in Washington, California, and Colorado.

Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me for more help on this.


via @ILRC_SF: Legal Developments on ICE Holds – explanation & resources

DWN Blog - May 15, 2014 - 09:07

via Lena Graber, Special Projects Attorney, Immigrant Legal Resource Center

As many or all of you know, there have been some exciting developments on ICE holds/detainers in the last few weeks.  First a court of appeals found that they were not mandatory, and then an Oregon court found that holding someone on a detainer was unconstitutional and that the county owed her money damages.

As a result, dozens of sheriffs are changing their policies and refusing to act on any ICE holds.  See our map of detainer policies at ilrc.org/enforcement  (although it is getting hard to keep up with all the changes!)

Attached is a PDF short advisory from ILRC on the recent court decisions and what they mean, as well as advice on how to use this information with your own local sheriffs or other law enforcement and elected officials.  Also attached are PDF letters that were sent from NWIRP, ACLU, and several California organizations to sheriffs in Washington, California, and Colorado.

Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me for more help on this.


via @LatinoAdvocacy1: Leaders of #NWDC Resistance Meet with Members of House Judiciary Committee and Homeland Security Officials in DC;

DWN Blog - May 14, 2014 - 11:02
For Immediate Release May 12, 2014

CONTACT: Angelica Chazaro (646) 496-5724

CONTACT: Maru Mora Villalpando, 206-251-6658

Undocumented Leaders of NWDC Resistance Meet with Members of House Judiciary Committee and Homeland Security Officials in DC; Lawsuit Withdrawn; Organizing Continues

Tacoma, WA – Last Thursday  two undocumented leaders of the Northwest Detention Center Resistance  met with four members of the House Judiciary Committee. The Congresspeople, all co-sponsors of  the Accountability in Immigration Detention Act, were Suzan DelBene (D-WA), Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), Ted Deutch (D-FL) and Joe Garcia (D-FL). The two leaders from NWDC Resistance were Jose Moreno, who helped organize the March 7 hunger strike inside the Northwest Detention Center and supported from the outside once he was released on bond, and Maru Mora Villalpando, who was a leader of the Feb. 24th action that delayed deportations for a week and led support for the hunger strike. “The fact that we were able to met with key Congressmembers means we undocumented immigrants are not longer being ignored. Our activism is paying off”, said Maru Mora Villalpando in reference to the meeting.

On Friday they discussed the President’s order to devise changes in the immigration system with top officials of the Department of Homeland Security, including Esther Olivares, council to Jeh Johnson and Tae Johnson, assistant director for custody management.  Moreno and Maru spoke with them about specific technical changes that need to be made to detention and deportation practices and provided stories of people in the detention center who are suffering as a result of ICE practices. The officials asked for more specifics and indicated that they are concerned about the history of failure for administration changes to make a difference in the field. “We were able to communicate with elected officials in Congress and DHS top administrators that we are human beings, and even in detention people should be treated as such” said Jose Moreno.

The hunger strikers expressed their appreciation for the ACLU and Columbia Legal Service in the wake of the voluntary dismissal of  the April 2nd federal lawsuit that vindicated their Free Speech rights.  The lawsuit was brought when twenty people in the NWDC were put in solitary confinement for engaging in a hunger strike to  protest the United States’ immigration policies and poor conditions at the NWDC, a protest that gained national and international attention.  The hunger strikers were immediately released after the lawsuit was filed.

This fight to protect the rights of whistleblowers on detention conditions was successful because ICE was put on notice that the can’t suppress peaceful protest without legal consequences. Knowing that retaliation will meet with strong public exposure and legal action will make it easier to continue organizing to expose the conditions in the immigration prison and the need to stop deportations and the use of prison-like detention for a civil process.

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Further resources: