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via @LatinoAdvocacy1: Leaders of #NWDC Resistance Meet with Members of House Judiciary Committee and Homeland Security Officials in DC;

DWN Blog - May 14, 2014 - 11:02
For Immediate Release May 12, 2014

CONTACT: Angelica Chazaro (646) 496-5724

CONTACT: Maru Mora Villalpando, 206-251-6658

Undocumented Leaders of NWDC Resistance Meet with Members of House Judiciary Committee and Homeland Security Officials in DC; Lawsuit Withdrawn; Organizing Continues

Tacoma, WA – Last Thursday  two undocumented leaders of the Northwest Detention Center Resistance  met with four members of the House Judiciary Committee. The Congresspeople, all co-sponsors of  the Accountability in Immigration Detention Act, were Suzan DelBene (D-WA), Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), Ted Deutch (D-FL) and Joe Garcia (D-FL). The two leaders from NWDC Resistance were Jose Moreno, who helped organize the March 7 hunger strike inside the Northwest Detention Center and supported from the outside once he was released on bond, and Maru Mora Villalpando, who was a leader of the Feb. 24th action that delayed deportations for a week and led support for the hunger strike. “The fact that we were able to met with key Congressmembers means we undocumented immigrants are not longer being ignored. Our activism is paying off”, said Maru Mora Villalpando in reference to the meeting.

On Friday they discussed the President’s order to devise changes in the immigration system with top officials of the Department of Homeland Security, including Esther Olivares, council to Jeh Johnson and Tae Johnson, assistant director for custody management.  Moreno and Maru spoke with them about specific technical changes that need to be made to detention and deportation practices and provided stories of people in the detention center who are suffering as a result of ICE practices. The officials asked for more specifics and indicated that they are concerned about the history of failure for administration changes to make a difference in the field. “We were able to communicate with elected officials in Congress and DHS top administrators that we are human beings, and even in detention people should be treated as such” said Jose Moreno.

The hunger strikers expressed their appreciation for the ACLU and Columbia Legal Service in the wake of the voluntary dismissal of  the April 2nd federal lawsuit that vindicated their Free Speech rights.  The lawsuit was brought when twenty people in the NWDC were put in solitary confinement for engaging in a hunger strike to  protest the United States’ immigration policies and poor conditions at the NWDC, a protest that gained national and international attention.  The hunger strikers were immediately released after the lawsuit was filed.

This fight to protect the rights of whistleblowers on detention conditions was successful because ICE was put on notice that the can’t suppress peaceful protest without legal consequences. Knowing that retaliation will meet with strong public exposure and legal action will make it easier to continue organizing to expose the conditions in the immigration prison and the need to stop deportations and the use of prison-like detention for a civil process.

###

Further resources:

 


via @NIJC: Legislation Would Improve Detention Standards & #EndtheQuota

DWN Blog - May 14, 2014 - 10:44

via NIJC: For Immediate Release

 

Contact: Julia Toepfer (312) 660-1635
jtoepfer@heartlandalliance.org

Statement of Mary Meg McCarthy, Executive Director, Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center

CHICAGO (May 13, 2014) — Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC) applauds Congressman Adam Smith (D-WA) for introducing legislation late last week, the Accountability in Immigration Detention Act of 2014 (H.R. 4620), to improve standards and conditions at detention centers nationwide. The bill addresses many of NIJC’s detention priorities, including facility oversight and accountability, elimination of the bed quota, expanded use of alternatives to detention (ATDs), access to legal services, and solitary confinement.

As they stand today, detention standards are not statutorily enforceable, thereby eliminating meaningful accountability for detention centers that do not meet the minimum standards. Consequently, thousands of individuals are held in inhumane conditions. Many detainees pose little or no public safety risk and could be released while they await their hearing. Continued detention of these individuals costs taxpayers $5 million per day or $2 billion per year, and leaves thousands of families to struggle emotionally and financially. Congressman Smith’s proposed legislation improves detention conditions, helps keep families together, and:

  • Creates oversight mechanisms with meaningful accountability. The legislation requires annual inspections of all detention facilities by the Department of Homeland Security and independent third party auditors. Detention centers that score poorly on two consecutive inspections will have their contracts terminated within 60 days.
  • Eliminates the bed quota. Every day, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) holds an average of 34,000 individuals in detention due to a congressional appropriations quota. No other law enforcement agency operates under this type of quota. Eliminating the bed quota will save taxpayer money by allowing ICE to make custody determinations based on individual circumstances rather than the need to meet an arbitrary number.
  • Expands ATD programs in all field offices. Increased use of ATDs, which cost as little as 70 cents to $17 daily, could save taxpayers $1.44 billion annually. Moreover, ATDs allow individuals who pose little to no public safety risk to return to their families and communities while they await their immigration hearing.
  • Increases access to legal services. The legislation requires future facilities be within 50 miles of a community where there is a demonstrated capacity to provide free or low-cost legal services. It also requires that all detainees receive information on their legal rights through Legal Orientation Programs.
  • Limits the use of solitary confinement. The bill stipulates that facilities should not subject detainees to solitary confinement, shackling, or strip searches unless less coercive measures are unable to ensure the safety of others. In addition, the legislation requires reporting and review after any placement in solitary confinement lasting three consecutive days or three days out of a seven-day period.

The legislation comes on the heels of a two-month hunger strike at the Northwest Detention Center (NWDC) in Tacoma, Washington. Detained immigrants demanded an end to arbitrary solitary confinement practices, poor treatment by guards, and inadequate meals and conditions. These problems extend beyond the NWDC to detention centers across the country.

NIJC thanks Congressman Smith for his leadership and calls on House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) to bring to the floor this and other immigration reforms in a comprehensive package before the August recess.

###

With offices in Chicago, Indiana, and Washington, D.C., Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center is a nongovernmental organization dedicated to ensuring human rights protections and access to justice for all immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers through a unique combination of direct services, policy reform, impact litigation, and public education. For more information visit http://www.immigrantjustice.org.


via @NIJC: Legislation Would Improve Detention Standards & #EndtheQuota

DWN Blog - May 14, 2014 - 10:44

via NIJC: For Immediate Release

 

Contact: Julia Toepfer (312) 660-1635
jtoepfer@heartlandalliance.org

Statement of Mary Meg McCarthy, Executive Director, Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center

CHICAGO (May 13, 2014) — Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC) applauds Congressman Adam Smith (D-WA) for introducing legislation late last week, the Accountability in Immigration Detention Act of 2014 (H.R. 4620), to improve standards and conditions at detention centers nationwide. The bill addresses many of NIJC’s detention priorities, including facility oversight and accountability, elimination of the bed quota, expanded use of alternatives to detention (ATDs), access to legal services, and solitary confinement.

As they stand today, detention standards are not statutorily enforceable, thereby eliminating meaningful accountability for detention centers that do not meet the minimum standards. Consequently, thousands of individuals are held in inhumane conditions. Many detainees pose little or no public safety risk and could be released while they await their hearing. Continued detention of these individuals costs taxpayers $5 million per day or $2 billion per year, and leaves thousands of families to struggle emotionally and financially. Congressman Smith’s proposed legislation improves detention conditions, helps keep families together, and:

  • Creates oversight mechanisms with meaningful accountability. The legislation requires annual inspections of all detention facilities by the Department of Homeland Security and independent third party auditors. Detention centers that score poorly on two consecutive inspections will have their contracts terminated within 60 days.
  • Eliminates the bed quota. Every day, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) holds an average of 34,000 individuals in detention due to a congressional appropriations quota. No other law enforcement agency operates under this type of quota. Eliminating the bed quota will save taxpayer money by allowing ICE to make custody determinations based on individual circumstances rather than the need to meet an arbitrary number.
  • Expands ATD programs in all field offices. Increased use of ATDs, which cost as little as 70 cents to $17 daily, could save taxpayers $1.44 billion annually. Moreover, ATDs allow individuals who pose little to no public safety risk to return to their families and communities while they await their immigration hearing.
  • Increases access to legal services. The legislation requires future facilities be within 50 miles of a community where there is a demonstrated capacity to provide free or low-cost legal services. It also requires that all detainees receive information on their legal rights through Legal Orientation Programs.
  • Limits the use of solitary confinement. The bill stipulates that facilities should not subject detainees to solitary confinement, shackling, or strip searches unless less coercive measures are unable to ensure the safety of others. In addition, the legislation requires reporting and review after any placement in solitary confinement lasting three consecutive days or three days out of a seven-day period.

The legislation comes on the heels of a two-month hunger strike at the Northwest Detention Center (NWDC) in Tacoma, Washington. Detained immigrants demanded an end to arbitrary solitary confinement practices, poor treatment by guards, and inadequate meals and conditions. These problems extend beyond the NWDC to detention centers across the country.

NIJC thanks Congressman Smith for his leadership and calls on House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) to bring to the floor this and other immigration reforms in a comprehensive package before the August recess.

###

With offices in Chicago, Indiana, and Washington, D.C., Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center is a nongovernmental organization dedicated to ensuring human rights protections and access to justice for all immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers through a unique combination of direct services, policy reform, impact litigation, and public education. For more information visit http://www.immigrantjustice.org.


Watch: Dignity, Not Detention – Catalina Nieto at @TEDxFoggyBottom

DWN Blog - May 14, 2014 - 10:22

At TEDx Foggy Bottom, Catalina Nieto, an activist for human rights and immigration, shares her personal message of advocacy and action.

Catalina Nieto is the Field Director of the Detention Watch Network (DWN), a national coalition of organizations and individuals working to expose and challenge the injustices of the U.S. immigration detention and deportation system. Ever since Catalina migrated from Colombia to the United States in 2000, she has been actively engaged in the immigrant rights and Latin American solidarity movement as a community organizer, artist and popular educator. Through her work at DWN, Catalina supports local and national organizing against detention expansion and towards policies that promote the rights and dignity of all persons. Catalina graduated with an M.A. in Social Justice and Intercultural Relations from SIT Graduate Institute in Vermont and a double B.A. in Sociology and Communications, Media and Theater from Northeastern Illinois University. Before joining DWN, Catalina worked as a community organizer with the immigrant rights organization Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Coalition (TIRRC), the Latin American solidarity organization Witness for Peace, and supported movement building as an interpreter and popular educator with the Highlander Center for Popular Education and the Wayside Center for Popular Education.

“SimplyZinhle Production” – Filming and production directed by Zinhle Essamuah. http://simplyzinhle.com

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)


Watch: Dignity, Not Detention – Catalina Nieto at @TEDxFoggyBottom

DWN Blog - May 14, 2014 - 10:22

At TEDx Foggy Bottom, Catalina Nieto, an activist for human rights and immigration, shares her personal message of advocacy and action.

Catalina Nieto is the Field Director of the Detention Watch Network (DWN), a national coalition of organizations and individuals working to expose and challenge the injustices of the U.S. immigration detention and deportation system. Ever since Catalina migrated from Colombia to the United States in 2000, she has been actively engaged in the immigrant rights and Latin American solidarity movement as a community organizer, artist and popular educator. Through her work at DWN, Catalina supports local and national organizing against detention expansion and towards policies that promote the rights and dignity of all persons. Catalina graduated with an M.A. in Social Justice and Intercultural Relations from SIT Graduate Institute in Vermont and a double B.A. in Sociology and Communications, Media and Theater from Northeastern Illinois University. Before joining DWN, Catalina worked as a community organizer with the immigrant rights organization Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Coalition (TIRRC), the Latin American solidarity organization Witness for Peace, and supported movement building as an interpreter and popular educator with the Highlander Center for Popular Education and the Wayside Center for Popular Education.

“SimplyZinhle Production” – Filming and production directed by Zinhle Essamuah. http://simplyzinhle.com

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)


Call to #EndtheQuota Today!

DWN Blog - May 7, 2014 - 11:34
Today, people directly impacted by detention, advocates, faith communities and members and allies of Detention Watch Network (DWN) will take part in an advocacy day on Capitol Hill organized by DWN and CAMBIO. They will be asking members of Congress to End The Quota! Amplify their voices by calling your member of Congress today, Wednesday, May 7th and tell them Congress should eliminate the detention bed quota, which ensures funding to keep an average of 34,000 immigrants locked up in ICE detention facilities on any given day.

What You Can Do Today to #EndTheQuota Call your Senators and Representative: 

  • Click here to find your Senators and their phone numbers
  • Click here to find your Representative and his/her phone number
  • Call (202) 224-3121 for the Capitol Switchboard
Sample Script: My name is _____ calling from ­­­­­_____.  As a constituent, I oppose funding for the immigration detention bed quota, which ensures that 34,000 immigrants are incarcerated in ICE detention facilities at any given time. I urge you to contact members of the Appropriations Committee, Homeland Security Subcommittee, and tell them that you oppose the immigration detention bed quota.  If the bed quota is included in appropriations, I hope you will support an amendment to strike it from the final appropriations bill. Background Information: The detention bed quota is an unprecedented policy – no other law enforcement agency operates on a quota system.

  • The cost to maintain the unmanageable system of immigration is excessive. In 2012, ICE detained an estimated 478,000 immigrants and ICE’s current detention budget is just short of $2 billion. During a time of fiscal crisis, it is unacceptable to be spending billions in taxpayer dollars each year to needlessly detain immigrants to fill a quota.
  • Money appropriated for the bed quota often lines the pockets of the for-profit prison corporations that run nearly half of the beds in immigration jails. The two top private prison companies, Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) and the GEO Group, have a combined annual revenue of over $3 billion.
  • With a guaranteed need for detention “beds” or jail cells, the detention bed quota essentially forces the use of facilities that have poor track records in which innumerable human rights abuses and dozens of deaths have occurred. These facilities have issues ranging from no access to the outdoor space, maggot- and worm-infested food, and wholly inadequate medical and mental health care.
We encourage you to schedule a meeting with your member of Congress (either in DC or in the district office) to follow-up after your call. Did you call or meet with your Member of Congress?  Tell us how it went.  We need your help in tracking which Members of Congress will help us end the quota!

Tweet today about the advocacy day and your opposition to a bed quota with #EndTheQuota: Sample Tweets: TODAY @DetentionWatch & @CAMBIOtoday is bringing families, faith leaders & advocates @uscapitol to say #EndTheQuota #stopice & #Not1More .@RepHalRogers Immigration detention bed quota is wasteful & unnecessary. No other law enforcement uses a bed quota! #EndTheQuota#Not1More .@houseappropsgop Immigrants are not numbers to fill a bed quota & line pockets of #privateprisons corporations! #EndTheQuota #2million2many .@SenateApprops ICE detention & deportations are breaking apart families & costing taxpayers billions #EndTheQuota #not1more #2million2many .@SenLandrieu Detention bed quota costs nearly $2 billion & prevents real immigration reform! Counting on you to #EndTheQuota #2million2many End the Quota Action: Join us in Washington, D.C. as we march, we rally, and take a public stance against the arbitrary quota that requires the incarceration of 34,000 immigrants in detention at any given time.What: End The Quota March and Action in Washington, D.C.
Where: Meet outside the Smithsonian Metro Station (Orange/Blue Line)
Time: 3:00 p.m.
When: Friday, May 9th, 2014

Facebook event

Call to #EndtheQuota Today!

DWN Blog - May 7, 2014 - 11:34
Today, people directly impacted by detention, advocates, faith communities and members and allies of Detention Watch Network (DWN) will take part in an advocacy day on Capitol Hill organized by DWN and CAMBIO. They will be asking members of Congress to End The Quota! Amplify their voices by calling your member of Congress today, Wednesday, May 7th and tell them Congress should eliminate the detention bed quota, which ensures funding to keep an average of 34,000 immigrants locked up in ICE detention facilities on any given day.

What You Can Do Today to #EndTheQuota Call your Senators and Representative: 

  • Click here to find your Senators and their phone numbers
  • Click here to find your Representative and his/her phone number
  • Call (202) 224-3121 for the Capitol Switchboard
Sample Script: My name is _____ calling from ­­­­­_____.  As a constituent, I oppose funding for the immigration detention bed quota, which ensures that 34,000 immigrants are incarcerated in ICE detention facilities at any given time. I urge you to contact members of the Appropriations Committee, Homeland Security Subcommittee, and tell them that you oppose the immigration detention bed quota.  If the bed quota is included in appropriations, I hope you will support an amendment to strike it from the final appropriations bill. Background Information: The detention bed quota is an unprecedented policy – no other law enforcement agency operates on a quota system.

  • The cost to maintain the unmanageable system of immigration is excessive. In 2012, ICE detained an estimated 478,000 immigrants and ICE’s current detention budget is just short of $2 billion. During a time of fiscal crisis, it is unacceptable to be spending billions in taxpayer dollars each year to needlessly detain immigrants to fill a quota.
  • Money appropriated for the bed quota often lines the pockets of the for-profit prison corporations that run nearly half of the beds in immigration jails. The two top private prison companies, Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) and the GEO Group, have a combined annual revenue of over $3 billion.
  • With a guaranteed need for detention “beds” or jail cells, the detention bed quota essentially forces the use of facilities that have poor track records in which innumerable human rights abuses and dozens of deaths have occurred. These facilities have issues ranging from no access to the outdoor space, maggot- and worm-infested food, and wholly inadequate medical and mental health care.
We encourage you to schedule a meeting with your member of Congress (either in DC or in the district office) to follow-up after your call. Did you call or meet with your Member of Congress?  Tell us how it went.  We need your help in tracking which Members of Congress will help us end the quota!

Tweet today about the advocacy day and your opposition to a bed quota with #EndTheQuota: Sample Tweets: TODAY @DetentionWatch & @CAMBIOtoday is bringing families, faith leaders & advocates @uscapitol to say #EndTheQuota #stopice & #Not1More .@RepHalRogers Immigration detention bed quota is wasteful & unnecessary. No other law enforcement uses a bed quota! #EndTheQuota#Not1More .@houseappropsgop Immigrants are not numbers to fill a bed quota & line pockets of #privateprisons corporations! #EndTheQuota #2million2many .@SenateApprops ICE detention & deportations are breaking apart families & costing taxpayers billions #EndTheQuota #not1more #2million2many .@SenLandrieu Detention bed quota costs nearly $2 billion & prevents real immigration reform! Counting on you to #EndTheQuota #2million2many End the Quota Action: Join us in Washington, D.C. as we march, we rally, and take a public stance against the arbitrary quota that requires the incarceration of 34,000 immigrants in detention at any given time.What: End The Quota March and Action in Washington, D.C.
Where: Meet outside the Smithsonian Metro Station (Orange/Blue Line)
Time: 3:00 p.m.
When: Friday, May 9th, 2014

Facebook event

Watch via @AFLCIO: 90-by-60-Foot Light Display Makes Big Statement on Deportations

DWN Blog - May 1, 2014 - 11:42

via AFL-CIO:

“On the eve of May Day, the AFL-CIO joined the #Not1More deportation hunger strikers at our headquarters to lift up the plight of immigrant families who are being torn apart from each other.

Check out the statement we made on the front of our building below and watch a video of the program here.”


Watch via @AFLCIO: 90-by-60-Foot Light Display Makes Big Statement on Deportations

DWN Blog - May 1, 2014 - 11:42

via AFL-CIO:

“On the eve of May Day, the AFL-CIO joined the #Not1More deportation hunger strikers at our headquarters to lift up the plight of immigrant families who are being torn apart from each other.

Check out the statement we made on the front of our building below and watch a video of the program here.”


Become DWN Conference Partner | Hazte Patrocinador de la Conferencia de DWN

DWN Blog - April 24, 2014 - 14:53

The DWN 10th National Member Conference is now exactly two weeks away. But we are still short of our goal to raise $5000 to support travel scholarships and conference activities.

We are asking you, our members, allies, colleagues and friends, to help us reach our goal.

You can help by becoming a DWN Conference Partner.

To become a DWN Conference Partner, we ask that you give a meaningful donation: from $5 to $500, all of which will go to support conference travel scholarships and conference activities.

In return, we will:

  • Acknowledge you/your organization in program materials as a DWN Conference Partner.
  • Promote your next event/report/website (etc) through quote boards that will be displayed throughout the conference space.
  • Provide a complimentary ticket to DWN’s Conference Raffle for an opportunity to win great prizes! (including t-shirts, books, art, a mini-Ipad and a free one-year DWN membership).
Sending in your Donation

Tides Center is our fiscal sponsor. You can donate online through Tides Center’s Donate Now site (choose project Detention Watch Network). Please add “DWN Conf Partner” in the dedication line so we know to contact you.

You can also send a check, made out to Tides Center to our DC office mailing address: DWN,3333 14th Street NW, Suite 205,Washington, DC 20010. Please include “DWN Conf Partner” in the subject line of your check.

DWN Conference Partner donations must be received by Friday, May 2 in order for us to provide benefits.

AND DON’T FORGET TO REGISTER!

Tomorrow Friday, April 25th is the last day to register. Register Now.

—————-

Solo faltan dos semanas para la décima conferencia nacional de DWN y aún no llegamos a nuestra meta de recaudar $5000 para el programa de becas para transporte y apoyar otras actividades de la conferencia.

A nuestros miembros, aliados, colegas y amigos, les estamos haciendo un llamado especial para ayudarnos a lograr esta meta. Tú puedes ayudar haciéndote patrocinador de la conferencia.

Para hacerte patrocinador, pedimos que hagas una donación: entre $5 y $500 para apoyar el programa de becas de transporte y otras actividades de la conferencia.

A cambio, nosotros:

  • Haremos un reconocimiento de tu patrocinio (o el de tu organización) en los materiales de la conferencia.
  • Tendrás espacio en una cartelera para exponer tu mensaje para los asistentes a la conferencia. Por ejemplo, puedes usa el espacio para promover un evento, informe o tu página web.
  • Recibirás de cortesía un ticket a la rifa de la conferencia ¡con la oportunidad de ganar muchos premios! (camisetas, libros, arte, un mini-Ipad y un año gratis de membrecía a DWN.)
Como hacer tu donación

Tides Center es el ente fiscal de DWN. Puedes donar a través de la página de Donate Now de Tides Center (escoge Detention Watch Network). Por favor incluye “DWN Conf Partner” en la dedicatoria.

También puedes enviar un cheque a nombre de Tides Center a nuestra oficina: DWN,3333 14th Street NW, Suite 205,Washington, DC 20010. Por favor incluye “DWN Conf Partner” en el cheque.

Para poder conferir beneficios, necesitamos que las donaciones de patrocinio se reciban a más tardar el viernes 2 de mayo.

¡NO OLVIDES INSCRIBIRTE!

Este viernes 25 de abril es el ultimo dia para inscribirte a la conferencia. Inscríbete hoy.


Become DWN Conference Partner | Hazte Patrocinador de la Conferencia de DWN

DWN Blog - April 24, 2014 - 14:53

The DWN 10th National Member Conference is now exactly two weeks away. But we are still short of our goal to raise $5000 to support travel scholarships and conference activities.

We are asking you, our members, allies, colleagues and friends, to help us reach our goal.

You can help by becoming a DWN Conference Partner.

To become a DWN Conference Partner, we ask that you give a meaningful donation: from $5 to $500, all of which will go to support conference travel scholarships and conference activities.

In return, we will:

  • Acknowledge you/your organization in program materials as a DWN Conference Partner.
  • Promote your next event/report/website (etc) through quote boards that will be displayed throughout the conference space.
  • Provide a complimentary ticket to DWN’s Conference Raffle for an opportunity to win great prizes! (including t-shirts, books, art, a mini-Ipad and a free one-year DWN membership).
Sending in your Donation

Tides Center is our fiscal sponsor. You can donate online through Tides Center’s Donate Now site (choose project Detention Watch Network). Please add “DWN Conf Partner” in the dedication line so we know to contact you.

You can also send a check, made out to Tides Center to our DC office mailing address: DWN,3333 14th Street NW, Suite 205,Washington, DC 20010. Please include “DWN Conf Partner” in the subject line of your check.

DWN Conference Partner donations must be received by Friday, May 2 in order for us to provide benefits.

AND DON’T FORGET TO REGISTER!

Tomorrow Friday, April 25th is the last day to register. Register Now.

—————-

Solo faltan dos semanas para la décima conferencia nacional de DWN y aún no llegamos a nuestra meta de recaudar $5000 para el programa de becas para transporte y apoyar otras actividades de la conferencia.

A nuestros miembros, aliados, colegas y amigos, les estamos haciendo un llamado especial para ayudarnos a lograr esta meta. Tú puedes ayudar haciéndote patrocinador de la conferencia.

Para hacerte patrocinador, pedimos que hagas una donación: entre $5 y $500 para apoyar el programa de becas de transporte y otras actividades de la conferencia.

A cambio, nosotros:

  • Haremos un reconocimiento de tu patrocinio (o el de tu organización) en los materiales de la conferencia.
  • Tendrás espacio en una cartelera para exponer tu mensaje para los asistentes a la conferencia. Por ejemplo, puedes usa el espacio para promover un evento, informe o tu página web.
  • Recibirás de cortesía un ticket a la rifa de la conferencia ¡con la oportunidad de ganar muchos premios! (camisetas, libros, arte, un mini-Ipad y un año gratis de membrecía a DWN.)
Como hacer tu donación

Tides Center es el ente fiscal de DWN. Puedes donar a través de la página de Donate Now de Tides Center (escoge Detention Watch Network). Por favor incluye “DWN Conf Partner” en la dedicatoria.

También puedes enviar un cheque a nombre de Tides Center a nuestra oficina: DWN,3333 14th Street NW, Suite 205,Washington, DC 20010. Por favor incluye “DWN Conf Partner” en el cheque.

Para poder conferir beneficios, necesitamos que las donaciones de patrocinio se reciban a más tardar el viernes 2 de mayo.

¡NO OLVIDES INSCRIBIRTE!

Este viernes 25 de abril es el ultimo dia para inscribirte a la conferencia. Inscríbete hoy.


May 9 in #DC: Action to End The Quota! 9 de mayo en DC: Acción de no más cuota!

DWN Blog - April 23, 2014 - 14:13

Detention Watch Network (DWN) takes to the streets to End The Quota! Join us in Washington, D.C. as we march, we rally, and take a public stance against the arbitrary quota that requires the incarceration of 34,000 immigrants in detention at any given time.

  • What: DWN Takes to The Streets! End The Quota Action in DC!
  • When: Friday, May 9th, 2014
  • Time: 3:00 p.m.
  • Where: Meet outside the Smithsonian Metro Station (Orange and Blue Line), Washington, D.C.

We have the power to demand that Congress and President Obama eliminate the quota and stop the senseless targeting and incarceration of immigrants. Click here to learn more about the quota.

For more information and to get involved please contact Catalina Nieto, DWN Field Director at cnieto@detentionwatchnetwork.org or 202-350-9058.

————————————

La Red en Contra de la Detención (DWN por sus siglas en inglés) sale a las calles para poner fin a la cuota! Únete a nosotros en Washington, DC mientras marchamos, protestamos, y tomamos una postura pública en contra de la cuota arbitraria que requiere el mantener detenidos/as a 34.000 inmigrantes cada día.

  • Qué: ¡DWN sale a las calles en DC! ¡Acción de no más cuota!
  • Cuándo: Viernes, 09 de mayo 2014
  • Hora: 3:00 p.m.
  • Dónde: Punto de encuentro fuera de la estación de metro Smithsonian (Linea Naranja y Azul), Washington, DC.

Nosotros/as tenemos el poder para exigir que el Congreso y el presidente Obama eliminen la cuota y pongan en alto los ataques y el encarcelamiento de los/las inmigrantes. Haga clic aquí para aprender más sobre la cuota.

Para obtener más información y participar, por favor póngase en contacto con Catalina Nieto, Directora de Campo de DWN en cnieto@detentionwatchnetwork.org o 202-350-9058.


Your input needed: @HRW doing research on CBP abuses

DWN Blog - April 22, 2014 - 23:13

[español sigue]

Human Rights Watch is interested in speaking with people who have personal stories or direct knowledge of discriminatory, abusive, intimidating, or unlawful treatment or practices by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents in the border region (the Border Patrol) and at border crossings (Office of Field Operations).

We are interested in cases involving both US citizens and noncitizens. We are also seeking information about agency accountability for abuses, including the efficacy of CBP complaint mechanisms.

Human Rights Watch is an international, independent nonprofit organization that defends the rights of people worldwide. We cannot provide legal representation in any individual case, but our goal is to publish these accounts in a report and to ensure anyone interacting with federal immigration and border enforcement agencies is treated in a manner that respects their human rights.

If you would like to share your experience or knowledge of particular cases or if you have any questions, please contact Clara Long,
researcher in the US Program, at:

Clara Long
Human Rights Watch
100 Bush St. Ste 925
San Francisco, CA 94107
Email: longc@hrw.org
Phone: 510-882-0900

We plan to conduct interviews along the northern and southern borders or by phone. If you would like to keep your identity confidential, we
can change your name and any identifying details.

For more information on this project, please visit our Facebook page. For more information on our ongoing and past work on protecting the human rights of immigrants and their families in the United States, please see our website.

Human Rights Watch desea contactar a personas que tengan historias personales o conocimiento directo de trato discriminatorio, abusivo, intimidatorio o ilegal por parte de agentes de la oficina de Aduanas y Protección Fronteriza (CBP) a lo largo de la franja fronteriza (Border Patrol) y en los puertos de control de la frontera (Office of Field  Operations).

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Estamos interesados tanto en casos de ciudadanos, como de no ciudadanos estadounidenses. También deseamos obtener información sobre los procesos de rendición de cuentas por abusos y la eficacia de los mecanismos de denuncia por parte de la oficina de Aduanas y Protección Fronteriza.

Human Rights Watch es una organización sin fines de lucro internacional e independiente que defiende los derechos humanos de las personas en todo el mundo. Nuestra organización no ofrece representación legal en caso individual, pero nuestro objetivo es exigir cambios en la legislación y las políticas estadounidenses para garantizar que todos las personas sean tratadas con respeto a sus derechos humanos por parte de la oficina de Aduanas y Protección Fronteriza.

Si desea compartir su experiencia o conocimiento de casos particulares o si tiene alguna pregunta envíe un correo electrónico o llame a Clara
Long, investigadora del Programa de EE.UU.

Clara Long
Human Rights Watch
100 Bush St. Ste 925
San Francisco, CA 94107
longc@hrw.org
510-882-0900

Nuestra intención es llevar a cabo entrevistas en toda la region fronteriza o por telefono. Si desea mantener en el anonimato su identidad estamos en la mejor disposición de cambiar su nombre y datos personales de identificación. Para obtener más información sobre este proyecto, por favor visite
nuestro Facebook página. Para obtener más información sobre nuestro trabajo en curso o nuestros
proyectos anteriores en materia de protección de los derechos humanos de los inmigrantes y sus familias en los Estados Unidos, por favor visite nuestro sitio web en (en inglés) o  (en español).


We’re reaching a social media milestone: Time to celebrate!

DWN Blog - April 22, 2014 - 15:07

Since I help manage DWN’s social media, I wanted to let y’all know about an impressive milestone that we should reach today or tomorrow:

DWN will soon have 10,000 followers on Twitter!

In light of this, I thought a lofty goal would be raising $1.00 per follower for DWN’s upcoming conference and network expenses. That would be $10,000!

Since not all of our Twitter followers are pro-migrant individuals (some are organizations, anti-immigrant folks or possibly even robots), I thought folks could give slightly more to make up the difference.

So if you and your community have benefited from the work of Detention Watch Network either online, on conference calls or in person, why not chip in to show your support? $5.00 – $10.00 would make a big difference.

If we can successfully crowdfund our movement, imagine how much more we can challenge immigration detention and restore dignity for immigrant families in the US. It’s been a long struggle but we’re gaining new ground thanks to your individual and collective work.

DONATE NOW: http://bit.ly/dwn-donate


ICYMI Listen via @TellMeMoreNPR: Deported Jamaican Loses His American Dream

DWN Blog - April 21, 2014 - 15:57

via Tell Me More on April 17, 2014:
Howard Dean Bailey made a good life for himself in the U.S. But then, a decades-old run-in with the law led to his deportation. Does his story show the system failing or working?

Guest Host Celeste Headlee learns more about the United States’ deportation policies from Muzaffar Chishti of the Migration Policy Institute.


Watch via @studiorevolt: Trailer for “Cambodian Son”. @SEARAC Screening in #DC 4/28

DWN Blog - April 21, 2014 - 12:26

Please join us on April 28th for the Washington, DC preview screening of the new film “Cambodian Son” at West End Cinema, along with a Q&A with the filmmaker and a panel of community advocates.

Film Synopsis: Cambodian Son documents the life of deported poet, Kosal Khiev after receiving the most important performance invitation of his career—to represent the Kingdom of Cambodia at the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad. Kosal would travel to London having only taken two flights prior; first, as a 1-year-old refugee child whose family fled Cambodia and, then as a 32-year-old criminal “alien” forcibly returned to Cambodia in 2011. Armed only with memorized verses, he must face the challenges of being a deportee while navigating his new fame as Phnom Penh’s premiere poet. After the performances end and the London stage becomes a faint memory, Kosal is once again left alone to answer the central question in his life: “How do you survive when you belong nowhere?”

The film “CAMBODIAN SON” arrives at a time when Americans are in the midst of a fierce battle for humane immigration reform, and this documentary can be a vehicle to have deeper discussions, build consciousness about the experiences of immigrants from Asian America, and make connections between these experiences with other immigrant and refugee communities in the US.

Monday April 28 // Washington D.C.

West End Cinema

2301 M St NW

Washington, DC 20037

TIME: 7:00PM

Ticket Price: $ 10

Purchase Tix in advance: 202-419-3456 or online
Cinema website: http://www.westendcinema.com/

On the first leg of the tour – CAMBODIAN SON received the top Documentary Award at CAAMFest 2014.

Sponsors: Screening hosted by SEARAC (Southeast Asia Resource  Action Center)Co-hosted by DC Asian Pacific American Film

For more info about the DC screening, contact: Mari Quenemoen: mari@searac.org

ALL Preview Screening Dates Across the US & also listed on our website.

For any further inquiry about the film, please contact: Anida Yoeu Ali:  studiorevoltmedia@gmail.com

 


via @NIJC: Detained Asylum Seekers Sue Obama Administration to End Long Waits for Initial Interviews

DWN Blog - April 18, 2014 - 09:52
Department of Homeland Security Routinely Violates Laws Requiring Timely Reasonable Fear Interviews

Repost photo on Instagram

For Immediate Release

Contacts:

SAN FRANCISCO (April 17, 2014) — ACLU Foundation of Southern California, ACLU of Northern California, and Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC), along with the international law firm Reed Smith LLP, today filed a class action lawsuit in the Northern District of California on behalf of thousands of immigrants fleeing persecution who have faced months of detention while they await reasonable fear determinations, the first step in seeking protection in the United States when someone is forced to return following a deportation order.

“U.S. law and American values of justice demand that those who come to our country seeking safety deserve a fair and timely decision about their applications, particularly if they are detained,” said Michael Kaufman, a staff attorney with the ACLU of Southern California. “The Obama administration has failed to provide that.”

Click to view INFOGRAPHIC: Thousands of asylum seekers are stuck in detention while they wait for an initial interview. Check out this infographic on how people in detention tread the system of ‘reasonable fear.’

U.S. law mandates that when individuals who have been previously deported from the United States are apprehended by the Department of Homeland Security and express a fear of returning to their countries of origin, they must receive a reasonable fear determination within 10 days as to whether their fear is reasonable and whether they can proceed with a hearing on their application for protection before an immigration judge. The U.S. government has violated this law in thousands of cases where individuals have waited for three months or more, usually while detained, for their interviews and decisions. Because individuals who receive positive determinations are not automatically eligible for release from detention, the delays in receiving reasonable fear determinations further extend the often lengthy period of detention individuals already face during the rigorous asylum process.

“The breakdown in the reasonable fear process puts an extremely vulnerable population in even more danger,” said Julia Harumi Mass, senior staff attorney at the ACLU of Northern California. “Many of these individuals tried to make a life in their countries of origin after being deported, but faced persecution and threats and now fear for their lives. While they wait in immigration jails, many have families in the U.S. or abroad who depend on them and may also be in danger.”

Since President Obama took office, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) interior enforcement programs have taken at least two million immigrants from their communities, including many long-time U.S. residents. Many left behind families in the United States and were deported to countries that have become extremely violent and unsafe. Others were more recent asylum seekers who attempted to seek protection the first time they crossed the border but were caught up in fast-track border deportation processes and quickly deported without having their fear of return acknowledged. When these individuals reenter the United States, they usually face one of two scenarios: their previous deportation orders are reinstated and they are removed without an opportunity to see a judge, or they have an opportunity to express their fear and are detained and placed into the reasonable fear process with hopes that they may be allowed to see a judge.

For Marco Antonio Alfaro Garcia, a named plaintiff in the lawsuit, the government’s failure to comply with its own rules has caused his family unnecessary pain and trauma. His youngest son was born while Mr. Garcia was detained and his two other U.S.-citizen children, ages four and three, cry daily, fearing they will never see their father again. Mr. Garcia was born in El Salvador and has lived in the United States since 2007. In January 2014 he was arrested by police and charged with driving under the influence. He was turned over to immigration authorities within hours, and informed that he would be sent back to El Salvador under a 2005 deportation order. Mr. Garcia immediately told immigration officials he feared returning to his homeland because he was twice brutally beaten by police, and feared retaliation because he had provided information about a criminal group to local prosecutors. On February 11, 2014, Mr. Garcia was finally interviewed by an asylum officer. More than two months later, Mr. Garcia has yet to receive a reasonable fear determination. He remains detained at the Adelanto Detention Facility, located about 80 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. Immigration officials have told him it could take up to six months before he receives a determination.

The delays not only result in inhumane and lengthy detention, but also are extremely costly to taxpayers, who are needlessly made to pay tens of millions of dollars as a result of the government’s failure to provide a timely decision. The federal government spends $119 a day to detain an immigrant.

Recently, President Obama and DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson announced that DHS will review immigration enforcement priorities to ensure they are as humane as possible within the constraints of the law. Promptly providing reasonable fear determinations for individuals seeking protection in the U.S. is the humane and resource-efficient solution.

“As our clients have experienced, the dysfunctional reasonable fear process subjects many people to lengthy, inhumane, and extremely costly detention before their asylum cases can even begin,” said NIJC Associate Director of Litigation Claudia Valenzuela. “It’s in everyone’s interest to have these cases quickly adjudicated.”

“By providing the relief sought in this case, the Court will assure that those who seek protection from torture or persecution in their countries of origin will receive the timely process guaranteed to them under U.S. law,” said James Rolfes, partner at Reed Smith LLP. “This system, when working as designed and mandated, gives hope to those who seek a new life in the United States.”

Link to this statement and the complaint: http://www.immigrantjustice.org/press_releases/detained-asylum-seekers-sue-obama-administration-end-long-waits-initial-interviews#.U0_jobSB4sg

About the National Immigrant Justice Center: With offices in Chicago, Indiana, and Washington, D.C., Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center is a nongovernmental organization dedicated to ensuring human rights protections and access to justice for all immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers through a unique combination of direct services, policy reform, impact litigation, and public education. For more information visitimmigrantjustice.org.

About Reed Smith LLP: Reed Smith is a global relationship law firm with more than 1,800 lawyers in 25 offices throughout the United States, Europe, Asia and the Middle East. Founded in 1877, the firm represents leading international businesses, from Fortune 100 corporations to mid-market and emerging enterprises. Its lawyers provide litigation and other dispute resolution services in multi-jurisdictional and other high-stakes matters; deliver regulatory counsel; and execute the full range of strategic domestic and cross-border transactions. Reed Smith is a preeminent advisor to industries including financial services, life sciences, health care, advertising, technology and media, shipping, energy and natural resources, real estate, manufacturing, and education. For more information, visit reedsmith.com.


Watch via @PuenteAZ: @WhiteHouse Hunger Strike: “Because Your Agents Came to Our Doors First”

DWN Blog - April 15, 2014 - 10:50

The immigration debate just came to the President’s doorstep

Add your name to ask the White House to meet with the strikers And let their loved ones go: bit.ly/whstrike


Watch via @WRCommission: A Family Torn Apart by Immigration Enforcement

DWN Blog - April 9, 2014 - 15:01

via Women’s Refugee Commission:

Jakir is one of more than 30,000 immigrants who are held each day in detention in the United States. Over the last decade, increased detention interrupted and sometimes destroyed relationships between children and their parents. Hundreds of thousands of families with immigrant parents and U.S. citizen children have been separated by detention and deportation.

Find out more at 25yearsleadingchange.org